Our Medical Council

Red Lily Foundation is guided by a medical council for all research and medical information.

Dr. Rowe is a Professor of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center in Baltimore, Maryland. His clinical interests have been in the area of diagnostic dilemmas and complex chronic illness.

Dr. Raj is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee. His primary interests involve understanding the mechanisms underlying POTS and then developing rational treatments for POTS.

They bring a clinical understanding of POTS that informs our decisions about directing research and education funds. They help us understand the complexities involved in POTS and related syndromes.

A statement from Dr. Rowe

There has been a marked increase in the recognition of orthostatic intolerance syndromes in the last 15 years. Although we do not have good epidemiologic data at this time, most of us who treat postural tachycardia syndrome and related disorders also believe there has been an increase in the incidence of these problems.

During this time there has been a mismatch between the number of patients who require care and the availability of specialists or the comfort level of generalists who might be able to see them. Given the potentially disabling nature of these conditions, and how much they can interfere with a good quality of life for both children and adults, it is going to be important to improve efforts at educating physicians and other health care providers on treatment, and to find better sources of research funding to improve understanding and find more effective treatments.

Red Lily Foundation will be dedicated to these tasks at a particularly opportune time, and I welcome the chance to work together with them toward these ends.

Biography: Peter C. Rowe, MD

Dr. Peter Rowe is a Professor of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center in Baltimore, Maryland. He graduated from the McMaster University Medical School, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, in 1981. From 1981 to 1987, he was a resident, General Academic Pediatrics research fellow, and Chief Resident in Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Between 1987 and 1991 he was a staff member at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada, and an Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, and of Pediatrics.

Dr. Rowe returned to Johns Hopkins University in 1991. He has published over 60 peer-reviewed papers, 10 book chapters, and edited the 11th edition of the Harriet Lane Handbook. His clinical interests have been in the area of diagnostic dilemmas and complex chronic illness, and he directed the Diagnostic Referral Clinic from 1991 to 1997. His early research interests were in the general area of clinical epidemiology in Pediatrics, but in the past 18 years his work has focused more exclusively on conditions characterized by chronic fatigue. His work first described the relationship between chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and treatable orthostatic intolerance syndromes, and the association between Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and CFS. He has directed the Chronic Fatigue Clinic at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center since 1996, where he is the inaugural recipient of the Sunshine Natural Wellbeing Foundation Chair in Chronic Fatigue and Related Disorders.

A statement from Dr Raj

Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) can be very difficult for patients. It is a disorder that can lead to a significant functional disability, often at the “prime” of a patient’s life. One of the greatest frustrations expressed to me by many of my patients is the lack of awareness about POTS by many physicians that they have seen. Many of my patients have told me that this lack of awareness, and sometimes disbelief, on the part of their physicians was most difficult.

It is clear that efforts to correct this “knowledge gap” and educate health practitioners about POTS are critical.

Red Lily Foundation will be dedicated to closing this knowledge gap. I look forward to working with them in these efforts.

Biography: Satish R Raj, MD MSCI

Dr. Satish R Raj is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee. He graduated from the Queen’s University Faculty of Medicine, Kingston, Ontario, Canada in 1993. He completed Residency training in Internal Medicine and Cardiology at Queen’s University, before pursuing a Clinical and Research Fellowship in Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology (heart rhythm disorders) at the University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. In 2002, he went to Vanderbilt University as a Research Fellow in Clinical Pharmacology. He worked in the Vanderbilt Autonomic Dysfunction Center, gaining training and experience in the study of human physiology. From 2002-2004, he completed a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation (MSCI) at Vanderbilt University. He joined the faculty of the Vanderbilt University, and has remained there since that time.

Dr. Raj is currently board certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology and Autonomic Disorders. He is an active member of the Vanderbilt Autonomic group where he cares for patients and conducts clinical research. He also works with the Cardiac Arrhythmia group, and is the Director of Clinical Arrhythmia Research. He has published over 50 peer-reviewed papers and 10 book chapters. He is Principal Investigator on a NIH grant, and a co-investigator on other grants, that seek to better understand the pathophysiology of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS). His primary interests involve understanding the mechanisms underlying POTS and then developing rational treatments for POTS.